Letter to the Faithful - St. Xenia Camp 2020

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June 30/July 13, 2020

Synaxis of the Glorious and All-famed Twelve Apostles

To my beloved children and brethren in the Lord,

It is with a heavy heart that I write this letter to you. Some of you might have already heard the
sad news, but we have to cancel this year’s St. Xenia’s Camp.

I'd like to thank all of the staff members who did all that they could to try to hold the camp this
year, despite all the difficulties and unknowns that we are currently facing. I was also encouraged
to hear about the enthusiasm that so many of you had, wanting to participate in this year’s camp.

Unfortunately, this pandemic has forced many states to implement rules and regulations to try to
keep the public safe. And because of these rules, it would have been impossible to hold St. Xenia’s
Camp the way we know and want to. It would have been too difficult to fully experience St.
Xenia’s Camp - to fully experience all of the activities that we have grown to love, surrounded by
Christian brotherhood and the intercessions of St. Xenia.

Our All-loving God, who wants only our salvation, allows things even as difficult as a virus, to
bring us closer to Him, and to concentrate on repenting for our sins. We should not get
discouraged that we are not having a camp. Rather, we should look towards our Savior and ask
Him to help us strengthen our faith, and pray that He protects us and our Church from
difficulties and tribulations. Let us strengthen our brotherhood with prayer and our participation
in the Divine Liturgies, so that we may remain united despite the great distances between us.

With our Lord’s help and the intercessions of our beloved St. Xenia, we will hold our camp next
year with more fervor and love. I pray that our Lord guides all of you during these difficult and
different times.

Your fervent Father and Chief Shepherd in the Lord,

Metropolitan Demetrius of America

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